Blog Posts Tagged ‘sewing’

It’s been a busy week here! Meadow and Urban Patch arrived on Tuesday morning, a few days behind schedule, and I spent the day unpacking, taking inventory and stacking bolts on our new shelves (I put Dave to work last week, as seen on our facebook page). Then I spent Wednesday shipping out dozens of boxes of fabric. It’s fun to know that the new prints are making their way all over the world! It’s always fun when the new collections finally arrive and get shipped off, but I only get a moment to savor the completion, because next week I have to have the final designs done for spring. Whew! Off and running… I’ll share a peek when they’re ready to go.

 

urban patch organic fabric

 

urban patch organic fabric

 

meadow organic fabric

 

meadow organic fabric

Happy Thursday, everyone! Today, the talented Karen LePage of One Girl Circus will be guest-blogging and sharing a tutorial for how to convert our On the Go dress pattern to a super cute peplum top. Karen is a pattern maker, author (Sewing For Boys) and seamstress extraordinaire , and has worked on all of our Monaluna patterns. Take it away, Karen!

 

TheOn the Go Dress is equally as charming when made up as a peplum blouse, and the process to convert the pattern is remarkably easy. Follow our tutorial to alter your pattern and you’ll have a blouse you can wear with anything you like when the weather turns too cool for a summer dress.

 

Note: When you make clothes from Monaluna patterns, you should first trace the pieces required in your size onto some sort of pattern paper. You can use anything from dedicated tracing medium found at the fabric store, to a roll of drawing paper from your kids’ art supply stash. The only requirement is that the paper must be transparent enough to see the lines you want to trace. Here’s a good tutorial on tracing patterns, if you need a little help.

 

 

Get Ready

 

 

Gather your traced copies of the three pieces that require adjustment: front skirt, back skirt, and button placket. You will use all the remaining pattern pieces as is, omitting the pockets.

Alter the Pattern

 

 

To make the blouse pictured here, use a ruler to measure down 6″ from the waist edge of your chosen size every few inches. Using a curved ruler (or a steady hand), connect the dots to form the peplum hem. Repeat for the back skirt. Use these new pieces to cut the peplum portion of your new blouse.

how to alter the skirt pattern tutorial diagrams

Now you’ll need to shorten the placket to accommodate the new shorter length of the “skirt” portion of the pattern. For the 6″ peplum pictured, the placket measurements are as follows:

XS: 22 1/2″ || S: 22 3/4″ || M: 23 1/4″ || L: 24 1/4″ || XL: 24 3/4″

 

Sew it Up

 

 

Construct according to the On the Go Dress instruction sheet, skipping the pocket. Pair with a cardigan or cropped jacket in cool weather.

 

Wear it!

 

 

Wear your new peplum blouse with everything from skinny jeans to trousers, from pencil mini to flowing maxi skirt to take you into cooler weather.

 

Happy Friday, everyone! It’s a gorgeous spring morning here, and I’m putting the finishing touches on a new collection for fall (peeks coming soon!). While I paint, Heidi from Fabric Mutt is back to share a tutorial for her Scooter Bag, using the Havana collection. Hello, Heidi!

 

The Scooter Bag

This soft, floppy bag is the perfect size for the reading mat along with some books, toys, or any other items you want to pack for the trip. The velcro closure is easy for little hands to open and close, and the long padded strap allows for comfortable crossbody wear.

Materials
(2) 22 x 13

Scrap Quilts

02/17

Hello, blogosphere! I’ve taken a long blog break, and these past few months have been a flurry of designing and growing here at Monaluna. Things are finally calming down a bit, and I’m excited to get back to projects and blogging.

 

I started last week with what turned out to be a pretty ambitious organizing project. I had been carefully ignoring the towering, disorganized scrap pile in my closet for months, and had finally had enough of it. At the same time, Anabelle’s school put out a call for extra blankets and quilts, and I decided it was time to make something from those extra odd pieces. The piecing for three little quilts only took Saturday afternoon, and I hardly had to cut – I just arranged the pieces I had in blocks, and trimmed them to fit where necessary. The backing, binding and quilting took a bit more time, but it felt really good to see them coming together, and I even hand quilted (very quickly and sloppily) 2 of the 3, the first time I’ve done that in years! It was so easy and fun that I decided to organize and bundle all the remaining scraps and make them available on the website. It turned out to be a bit of an undertaking, but in the 5 days since I put them up there they’ve been VERY popular, and the first batch are almost gone! Now that I have the hang of it I’ll be able to add them more frequently, though, and keep my scrap piles at more manageable levels.